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Insurance

Blue tow is insured with Costello for hull ($40,000) and liability.  This is a Commercial Policy that covers any pilot that flies it.   Cost is approximately $3000/year.

Anyone who flies an aircraft/glider at Air Sailing MUST have $1,000,000 liability coverage.  This means any NSA club member who owns a glider must have this coverage on his/her glider and NSA club members who do not own a glider must have non owner’s coverage of $1,000,000 liability.  Proof of this insurance must be attached to your ASI/NSA waiver before you fly.

Additionally, NSA Club members must carry $40,000 hull insurance to fly NSA aircraft:

Stews Off Field Excursion

Busy 532 resting between flights

Saturday, 2 August, 2008

Air Sailing Gliderport, Nevada

Subject: Off Field Landing in NSA 2-33 “532”

Launched on Runway 21 in blustery winds that were W to SW. Very turbulent, strong westerly winds with gusting. Strong sink between strong thermals. Thermals were moving west to east very fast.

Released from tow @6,400 –6,700 (in strong lift) just to the SW of the face of the “Red Rocks. Continued circling to the right after release to stay with the thermal. Climbed to about 7,500 feet or so. Thermal moved me too far east for my comfort zone at that altitude so I headed back west along the crest of the face of the Red Rock. Lots of sink. Worked across the NW side of the northwest facing drop off of the Red Rock plateau, over to the small “nob” in the valley just NNW and back across the crest of the road up to the top of the Red Rock plateau in moderate lift, zero sink and strong sink. About in line with a straight in approach azimuth to runway 21 but just west of the southernmost low hill of the Red Rock cluster at about 5300 feet I contacted a very strong thermal and turned in it. It was moving very quickly east, took me behind that group of hills and though I was back to 7,100 feet, again, I was uncomfortable with that much west wind – a headwind for me to get back to ASI. I decided to call it a day and head back to 21. From 7,100 feet it initially looked like I had enough altitude but I immediately hit needle pegging sink that stayed till the end of this flight. Initially I planned to slip slightly NW through a small notch and have a straight in to 21. Almost as quickly, I realized that with my sink rate and headwind, I would possibly be short and, though a longer path, switched to a SW track, around the low hills because there was a roughly SE-NW dirt road below me around the hills that went to the north end of 17/35. I was too low already by this time to even make the unoccupied fly-in home/runway development SW of the gun range and SE of ASI. Clearly, I was going to land out! Once that decision was clear I concentrated on staying lined up with the road, feathering it in, following the directional changes in the road and keeping my speed up. At the area where I finally touched down, the road ran a little along the side of the last (southernmost) hill. I had to keep the right wing slightly higher to keep it off the hillside, which I did till I finally ran out of flying speed and just stalled/settled straight in, probably 2-5 feet. The road ran up to meet my wheel there on a small rise so there wasn’t much impact, however, even after the stall, I still had some small forward momentum with no aerodynamic control. The right wingtip snagged a sagebrush and swung the fuselage around to the right about 70-80 degrees. I came to a stop facing uphill but with the main wheel and skid centered on the road, the nose sitting on the uphill bank and the tail facing south over a sagebrush and the small flash flood dry creek that ran alongside that portion of the road. That final energy event cracked a weld on the Robinson Swiveling Tail wheel mount and bent the forward mounting bolt for the


spring, a bolt designed to bend or shear in just such circumstances to protect the fuselage. Other than that and the small “nudge on the right wingtip where it caught the sagebrush, there is no apparent damage, no fabric tears, no bent metal (except for that right wingtip “nudge”). While waiting for assistance to arrive I pivoted the ship around and lined it back up with the road thinking someone would come with a tow rope and we would walk it back to 17/35. After pulling it around, I realized the tail wheel mount weld had cracked and normal rope towing would not work.

When Chukar, Coot, Varian and Stoney arrived, we elected to spin 532 back around and take it home tail first with the tail end of the fuselage (bottom) sitting on Varian’s pickup tail gate. With one person steadying the rear of the ship in the pickup, assisted by two tie down clips between hooks in the pickup bed and the elevator strut braces and a wing walker, we pulled the ship the quarter or so mile backwards to the north end of 17/35 and then back down 17 to it’s normal outside tie down.

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That is the technical description. Here’s the important stuff.

Very strong wind away from the field. Strong lift somewhat far spaced, strong

sink all around. When I tried to scratch up “one more time” east of 21, I should have called it and moved south to set up for a pattern, I was at 5,300 feet. As strong as the west-east wind was, I probably could have gone straight in using spoilers and a steep slip to bleed off the altitude. Don’t let this happen to you. I was lucky. Ship should be back in the air momentarily.

That’s it.

Stew Crane

Libelle Gathering

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July 3-7, 2009

Info Sheet


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Pete “Skimmer” Casti

 

Black Skimmer: Odd-looking, tern-like bird with black upperparts and white underparts.  Bright red bill with black tip.  They are the only birds in the world whose lower mandible is longer than the upper.   Long, slim wings are dark above and silver-gray below. Tail is white with black central feathers. Legs, feet are red.  Skimmers are named so because of the way they feed. This bird flies just above the water with its bill open, skimming the water’s surface with its long lower bill open like a pair of scissors. Their bodies are oddly proportioned:

The Black Skimmer is native to countries throughout Central America and the Caribbean. The range of the Black Skimmer is approximately 14 million kilometers. It is thought that the population of the Black Skimmer is about 200,000 individual birds.

Black Skimmer: Breeds along Atlantic and Gulf coasts from Massachusetts and Long Island to Florida and Texas. Spends winters north to southern California and Virginia; also in Central and South America. Preferred habitats include sandy or gravelly bars and beaches, shallow bays, estuaries, and salt marsh pools.

A group of skimmers are collectively known as a “conspiracy”.

Tristan “Woodpecker” Armstrong

 

The woodpecker’s strong, pointed beak acts as both a chisel and a crowbar to remove bark and find hiding insects. It has a very long tongue, up to four inches in some species – with a glue-like substance on the tip for catching insects. While most birds have one toe pointing back and three pointing forward on each foot, woodpeckers have two sharply clawed toes pointing in each direction to help them grasp the sides of trees and balance while they hammer. 

 

Woodpeckers live in wooded areas and forests.  They are known for tapping on tree trunks in order to find insects living in crevices in the bark and to excavate nest cavities. Some species drum on trees to communicate to other woodpeckers and as a part of their courtship behavior. Woodpeckers tap an estimated 8,000-12,000 times per day. 

Male and female woodpeckers work together to excavate a cavity in a tree that is used as a nest and to incubate eggs for about two weeks. When a woodpecker hatches, it is blind and does not have any feathers. One parent brings food to the nest while the other parent stays with the young.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob “Chukar” Spielman

Chukar

 

 

The Chukar, Alectoris chukar is a Eurasian upland gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds.It has been introduced widely for game hunters, and became established in the United States Rocky Mountains, Canada, New Zealand and Hawaii.
The Chukar is a resident breeder in dry, open, and often hilly country. In the wild, Chukar travel in groups of 5-40 birds called coveys. It nests in a scantily lined ground scrape laying 8 to 20 eggs. Chukars will take a wide variety of seeds and some insects as food; however, Downy Brome (Cheatgrass) is this species’ strong food preference.

Many knowlegable hunters consider chukar the most challenging of all the gamebirds. Its quick flight, steep habitat, and tendancy to run make it a challenge suitable for only the most dedicated and physically fit bird hunters.

The Chukar is a rotund 32-35 cm long bird, with a light brown back, grey breast, and buff belly. The face is white with a black gorget. It has rufous-streaked flanks and red legs. When disturbed, it prefers to run rather than fly, but if necessary it flies a short distance on rounded wings.

 

Chukar prefer rocky, steep, and open hillsides. In the United States, Oregon, Nevada and Idaho lead all other states in terms of wild chukar populations and harvest. However, they can be found in almost all the western states in isolated populations.

Chukar prefer rocky, steep, and open hillsides. In the United States, Oregon, Nevada and Idaho lead all other states in terms of wild chukar populations and harvest. However, they can be found in almost all the western states in isolated populations.

The Chukar is a resident breeder in dry, open, and often hilly country. In the wild, Chukar travel in groups of 5-40 birds called coveys. It nests in a scantily lined ground scrape laying 8 to 20 eggs. Chukars will take a wide variety of seeds and some insects as food; however, Downy Brome (Cheatgrass) is this species’ strong food preference.

Many knowlegable hunters consider chukar the most challenging of all the gamebirds. Its quick flight, steep habitat, and tendancy to run make it a challenge suitable for only the most dedicated and physically fit bird hunters.

The Chukar is a rotund 32-35 cm long bird, with a light brown back, grey breast, and buff belly. The face is white with a black gorget. It has rufous-streaked flanks and red legs. When disturbed, it prefers to run rather than fly, but if necessary it flies a short distance on rounded wings.

 

 

 

Skimmers April 5 adventure

Soaring weather is here!!!

 I had to work today and didn’t think I would be able to go flying. I was able to finish by 2:00, called the wife to let her know I was on the way home and she asked why I wasn’t going flying today. She knew that I will be out of town for 4 days next weekend and will be a bear to live with if I don’t fly at least once a week. So I took her advice and hoped to ketch Chickadee and Stoney at ASI before they left.

My Radio Controlled Glider friends had invited me out today too, but they would have been done by the time I made it out to the RC field at 3:30.

 

 On the way out, the day was sunny and clear with a nice South East wind. I saw two dust devils and figured this was a good sign. As I arrived at Airsailing there wasn’t a sole to be found except our trusty tow pilot Lee, and his side kick Bear. Stoney had already left, and Chickadee didn’t make it. The wind was still a bit from the South East and I asked Lee if he thought there was any lift. He wasn’t sure but was willing to tow me up to find out.

 I got the SGS 1-36 (20T) ready and Lee fired up the tow plane. At 3:30 we positioned on runway 17 and I had no idea of which way to go, so I let Lee take me to where ever he thought was good lift. It had been January since I had flown the 1-36 and lots of 2-33 time in between. The 1-36 rolled down the runway and quickly took flight. It was such a great feeling to have this light and responsive ship at my command that even if I sunk out, I would have been happy just to experience this great tow.

 Lee made a right-turn-out and headed for the South end of the Dog Skins over the Moon Rocks. I was having doubts in my mind thinking maybe the red rocks would be better as they were probably heating up and producing some thermals, but then I thought about it again, Lee is towing me up, he’ll find lift! A quick turn north along the Skins and up we went. I released in good lift at 7,300’. Lee had put me right in the best lift of the valley. I continued to circle over the skins working north and south climbing up to 8,000’ I noticed there was ridge lift but every once in a while a big thermal would move in taking me up to 9,000′. 

 I was up and down on the skins for some time. I even made a low pass on the ridge to wave at some dirt bikers on top. They were too busy riding to take notice of me though. I was up and down between 8,500’ and 7,300’. I made a little goal for myself that if I climbed back above 8,500’ I would try for the red rocks. At about 5:00 I ventured out a bit and landed a nice thermal just east of the ridge, this took me up to 10,000’ I was eyeballing Tule peak but decided to try for Red Rocks any way. I cruised across the valley with very little sink. Trying to work some marginal lift I was sinking out over the Red Rocks. Down at 6,500’ I thought I would be landing for sure. Just then a nice little thermal came up; I worked it back to 9,000’ this was turning into an awesome day. When I looked out to my right in this 9,000’ thermal I noticed I was not the only one having fun. There off my wing tip, were two Hawks. I tried to get a picture of them but they came out as little black dots, as you can see in the pictures.

 If I had checked the soaring forecast this morning I would have saw the K-Index was 0 and the lifted index was 7, this would have kept me at home. Thanks to my wife, forcing me to fly today, I got that long over due thermal flight that I have been looking forward to all winter. I was back on the ground at 6:10 and could have stayed up longer but my back was getting sore and nature was calling. :0) Over all the flight turned out to be 2 ½ hrs, thanks for making me fly today Honey.

 Thanks to Lee for being on site and brining me right to the lift.

 Air Sailing has the best lift, even when the forecast doesn’t think so.

 Time to get out and fly, April 18th is the ASI Spring clean up. Come on out, help out and catch your first thermal of the season.

 

Pete “Skimmer” Casti (CFIG)

 

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See if You can Match the Bird Call Sign with the Person

 

Transition to Gliders Flight Training

 

Part 61.87 of the FAR’s cover solo flight. Your instructor will review part 91 (flight rules) Part 830 (accident reporting) and the following procedures and operations:

 

 1 Proper flight preparation procedures, including preflight planning,  preparation, aircraft systems, and, if appropriate, powerplant operations.
 2 Taxiing or surface operations, including runups, if applicable.
 3 Launches, including normal and crosswind.
 4 Straight and level flight, and turns in both directions, if applicable.
 5 Airport traffic patterns, including entry procedures.
 6 Collision avoidance, windshear avoidance, and wake turbulence avoidance.
 7 Descents with and without turns using high and low drag configurations.
 8 Flight at various airspeeds.
 9 Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions.
10 Ground reference maneuvers, if applicable.
11 Inspection of towline rigging and review of signals and release procedures, if applicable.
12 Aerotow, ground tow, or self-launch procedures.
13 Procedures for disassembly and assembly of the glider.
14 Stall entry, stall, and stall recovery.
15 Straight glides, turns, and spirals.
16 Landings, including normal and crosswind.
17 Slips to a landing.
18 Procedures and techniques for thermalling.
19 Emergency operations, including towline break procedures.

 

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It is not common for student pilots to be permitted to fly cross country in gliders, but provisions are made in part 61.93.

 

To meet the requirements for the private glider flight test, you will need endorsements for all of the above, plus the items in 61.105:

1 Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to private pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations.
2 Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board.
3 Use of the applicable portions of the “Aeronautical Information Manual” and FAA advisory circulars.
4 Use of aeronautical charts for VFR navigation using pilotage, dead reckoning, and navigation systems.
5 Radio communication procedures.
6 Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts.
 7 Safe and efficient operation of aircraft, including collision avoidance, and recognition and avoidance of wake turbulence.
 8 Effects of density altitude on takeoff and climb performance.
 9 Weight and balance computations.
10 Principles of aerodynamics, powerplants, and aircraft systems.
11 Stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery techniques for the airplane and glider category ratings.
12 Aeronautical decision making and judgment.
13 Preflight action that includes – (i) How to obtain information on runway lengths at airports of intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements; and (ii) How to plan for alternatives if the planned flight cannot be completed or delays are encountered.

 

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Lee “Black Hawk” Edling

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The Common Black Hawk free sharpe s challenge movie download

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(Buteogallus anthracinus) is a bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, which also includes the eagles

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, hawks

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and Old World vultures.

The adult Common Black Hawk is 43–53 cm long and weighs 930g on average. It has very broad wings, and is mainly black or dark gray. The short tail is black with a single broad white band and a white tip. The bill is black and the legs and cere are yellow.

Sexes are similar, but immature birds are dark brown above with spotting and streaks. Their underparts are buff to whitish with dark blotches, and the tail has a number of black and white bars.

The Common Black Hawk feeds mainly on crabs, but will also take small vertebrates and eggs. This species is often seen soaring, with occasional lazy flaps, and has a talon-touching aerial courtship display. The call of the Common Black Hawk is a distinctive piping spink-speenk-speenk-spink-spink-spink.

It builds a platform nest of sticks fifteen to one hundred feet above the ground in a tree, often a mangrove. Nests are often reused and tend to grow bigger. It lays one to three eggs (usually one), which are whitish with brown markings.